Virgil

From Battlestar Wiki, the free, open content Battlestar Galactica encyclopedia and episode guide
BSG WIKI Storyarc.png This article has a separate continuity.
This article is in the Richard Hatch continuation separate continuity, which is related to the Original Series. Be sure that your contributions to this article reflect the characters and events specific to this continuity only.

Virgil is the tech chief[1] aboard Galactica in 7360[2].

Following Adama's demise and Puck's decision to vie for command of the Fleet, Virgil leads a labor strike aboard Galactica in support of Puck's ascension[3], necessitating Major Sheba's action to enlist Warriors to fill the workers' spots, including Lieutenant Jolly's assumption of Virgil's role[4]. Despite Virgil's objections that Sheba did not have that unilateral authority, she forces the issue and orders the striking workers to leave the bay[4].

Before Virgil leaves, Sheba reminds him that Lieutenant Commander Apollo saved his life several yahren prior, leaving Virgil stricken in shame and his exclamation that he couldn't help his actions[5].

Upon his return with Starbuck and Baltar, Apollo orders Jolly to drag Virgil to his duty station, so that Jolly is able to join in their defense of the Fleet from Lucifer's imminent attack[1] (RH: Armageddon).

Notes

  • The name "Virgil" is from the Latin, namely attributed to poet Publius Vergilius Maro, whose works are responsible for a trinity of poems: the Eclogues, the Georgics, and the Aenid. The name of this character is likely derived from this source, in keeping with the Original Series' tradition of utilizing names from various mythologies.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Hatch, Richard; Christopher Golden (1997). Armageddon. Byron Preiss, p. 229.
  2. Hatch, Richard; Christopher Golden (1997). Armageddon. Byron Preiss, p. 158.
  3. Hatch, Richard; Christopher Golden (1997). Armageddon. Byron Preiss, p. 159.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Hatch, Richard; Christopher Golden (1997). Armageddon. Byron Preiss, p. 160.
  5. Hatch, Richard; Christopher Golden (1997). Armageddon. Byron Preiss, p. 161.